Two Panoramic Views in Switzerland

In the heart of Europe one can find a quite significant accumulation of “structures and shapes”: The Alps. Today I’d like to share the outcome of two projects related to panoramic shots capturing this part of the World.

Each of the following pictures is composed of 10 shots in portait format and merged into one photo using Adobe Lightroom. For the first set I used a Canon EF 24-70 mm f/4L IS USM at 32 mm, 1/400 sec. and f/6.3 with ISO 100.  For the second set I used the same lens at 53 mm, 1/500 sec. and f/5.6 with ISO 100. I did not use a tripod. The size of the raw files are 1 and 1.5 GB. I’m showing reduced versions of 32 and 35 MB.

Below the view from a mountain called Niesen (2’362 m above mean sea level) located in the Swiss region “Berner Oberland”. The panoramic view captures an angle of approx. 230 degree and features the Bernese Alps from the north. From left to right: Thun, Lake Thun, Interlaken with Lake Brienz in the back followed by the famous mountains Eiger (“North Face”), Mönch and Jungfrau.

Berner Oberland
Panoramic View from Niesen

The next photo is the view from the Monte Generoso (1’701 m above mean sea level) located in the Swiss Canton Ticino. Here the Alps are shown from the south side. This panorama has an angle of approx. 270 degree. From left to right: In the front Lake Lugano, in the back Monte Rosa and the north end of Lake Maggiore, famous mountains Jungfrau, Mönch, Eiger, followed by the Finsterarhorn, Lugano, in the very front Monte Generoso peak, northeast end of Lake Lugano, Eastern Swiss Alps with Piz Bernina unfortunately in the clouds, Monte Legnone, north end of Lake Como, Monte Grigna Settentrionale.

Ticino
Panoramic View from Monte Generoso

Behind the Shot – Focus Stacking

2017-04-30 15-12-40 (B,Radius8,Smoothing4)-4-2

As part of my little series on “behind the shot” posts,  I’d like to showcase today the power of “focus stacking”! Here as example an olive tree sprout. In macro photography the depth of field is usually very short. Chosing a small aperture leads to long exposure and/or high ISO both negatively impacting the sharpness of the shot. So how to solve this dilemma?

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Blue Magic

Svinafell Gletscher, Island
Svinafellsjökull, Iceland

Iceland in winter is blue magic! Here I’m sharing shots from two glaciers in the south of Iceland. They carry blue ice! It’s blue because the compression in the glacier squeezed out any air bubbles and in this circumstance light of long wavelength like red, orange and yellow is absorbed by the ice while light of shorter wavelength such as blue or green remains.

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